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CESG Good Practice Guides (GPG)

Contributor(s): Tracey Caldwell

Good Practice Guides (GPG) are documents created by the CESG to help organisations manage risk effectively. CESG is the UK government's national technical authority for information assurance (IA).

CESG Good Practice Guides (GPGs) are supplemented by CESG Developers’ Notes, Cryptographic Standards and Implementation Manuals. Guides may be accessed only by suppliers working with a government department that sponsors the supplier to access one or more of the guides. 

The GPGs were originally written as a set of 35 guides. Some are no longer available because they have become obsolete. Others, which address currently critical topics, are offered on the CESG website.

Some of the Good Practice Guides that have received recent attention are:

  • GPG number 6, which provides guidance on managing the risks of offshoring.
  • GPG number 13, which describes a framework for addressing risks to government systems and includes protective monitoring controls for collecting information and communications technology (ICT) log information and configuring ICT logs in order to produce an audit trail.
  • GPG number 8, which focuses on protecting external connections to the Internet. 
  • GPG number 10, which addresses the risks of remote working.
  • GPG number 12, which provides guidance on managing the security risks of virtualisation for data separation.
  • GPG number 13 forms part of the Code of Connection (CoCo), a prescriptive technical standard that public-sector organizations must meet in order to gain access to the UK Government Connect Secure Extranet.
  • GPG number 18, which describes principles for security forensics.
This was last updated in May 2012

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