What is DIMM (dual in-line memory module)? - Definition from WhatIs.com


DIMM (dual in-line memory module)

Part of the Storage management glossary:

A DIMM (dual in-line memory module) is a double SIMM (single in-line memory module). Like a SIMM, it's a module containing one or several random access memory ( RAM ) chips on a small circuit board with pins that connect it to the computer motherboard . A SIMM typically has a 32 data bit (36 bits counting parity bits) path to the computer that requires a 72-pin connector. For synchronous dynamic RAM ( SDRAM ) chips, which have a 64 data bit connection to the computer, SIMMs must be installed in in-line pairs (since each supports a 32 bit path). A single DIMM can be used instead. A DIMM has a 168-pin connector and supports 64-bit data transfer. It is considered likely that future computers will standardize on the DIMM.

This was last updated in March 2011
Contributor(s): Evan Jennings
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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