Part of the Internet technologies glossary:

For more information, see Digital Subscriber Line.

G.Lite is the informal name for what is now a standard way to install Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL) service. Also known as Universal ADSL, G.Lite makes it possible to have Internet connections to home and business computers at up to 1.5 Mbps (millions of bits per second) over regular phone lines. Even at the lowest downstream rate generally offered of 384 Kbps (thousands of bits per second), G.Lite is about seven times faster than regular phone service with a V.90 modem and three times faster than an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) connection. Upstream speeds from the computer are at up to 128 Kbps. (Theoretical speeds for ADSL are much higher, but the data rates given here are what is realistically expected.)

With G.Lite, your computer's analog-to-digital modem is replaced with an "ADSL modem." and the transmission from the phone company is digital rather than the analog tranmission of "plain old telephone service." G.Lite is also known as "splitterless DSL" because, unlike other DSL technologies, it does not require that a technician come to install a splitter, a device that separates voice from data signals, at the home or business (sometimes referred to as "the truck roll").

The G.Lite standard was developed by the Universal ADSL Working Group, whose members include major phone companies in the U.S. and globally, including Ameritech, Bell Atlantic, BellSouth, GTE, MCI, USWest, Sprint, SBC Communications, Deutsche Telekom, France Telecom, British Telecommunications, Singapore Telecom, and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone. Microsoft, Intel, and Compaq are also represented in the Working Group.

The telephone companies and ADSL are competing with the cable TV companies and the cable modems to capture the market for fast Internet access. While phone companies conceded the early lead to the cable TV companies, most industry experts believe that G.lite and ADSL will eventually become the dominant technology for most homes and businesses.

The G.Lite standard is officially known as G.992.2.

This was last updated in April 2005
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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