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OS X

OS X is version 10 of the Apple Macintosh operating system . OS X was described by Apple as its first "complete revision" of the OS since the previous version is OS 9, with a focus on modularity so that future changes would be easier to incorporate. OS X incorporates support for UNIX -based applications as well as for those written just for the Macintosh.

One of the most visible differences from earlier Mac OS versions is a desktop with a 3-D appearance. OS X also includes the ability to play Quicktime movies in icon size, instant wake-from-sleep capability on portable computers, support for DVD movies and the ability to create audio CD s. OS X can be installed on an existing Mac with OS 9, allowing users can choose which one to use when the computer is started.

Since the first version of OS X, the operating system has gone through a series of upgrades, each with a feline code name. First came "Panther" (10.2), then "Jaguar" (10.3), "Tiger" (10.4) and then "Leopard " (10.5), scheduled for launch in 2007. Each iteration of the operating system included improvements to functionality, including a search function (Spotlight) and a software suite of image, sound and video editing applications bundled under the heading of "iLife."

OS X.5 (Leopard) will also feature "Boot Camp," which will allow users of new Apple computers built around Intel-processors to run Windows on their Macs.

This was last updated in August 2006

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