What is Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC)? - Definition from WhatIs.com

Definition

Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC)

Part of the IT standards and organizations glossary:

An OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog) is an online bibliography of a library collection that is available to the public. OPACs developed as stand-alone online catalogs, often from VT100 terminals to a mainframe library catalog. With the arrival of the Internet, most libraries have made their OPAC accessible from a server to users all over the world.

User searches of an OPAC make use of the Z39.50 protocol. This protocol can also be used to link disparate OPCS into a single "union" OPAC.

This was last updated in March 2011
Contributor(s): Simon Smith
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Related Terms

Definitions

  • mass (m)

    - Mass (symbolized m) is a dimensionless quantity representing the amount of matter in a particle or object. (WhatIs.com)

  • force

    - Force is an action that causes a free object with nonzero, finite mass to accelerate, relative to a non-accelerating frame of reference. (WhatIs.com)

  • MQTT (MQ Telemetry Transport)

    - MQTT (Message Queuing Telemetry Transport) is a lightweight messaging protocol that provides sensors and other resource-constrained network clients with a simple way to distribute telemetry informa... (IoT Agenda)

Glossaries

  • IT standards and organizations

    - Terms related to information technology (IT) standards, including definitions about IT organizations and words and phrases about policies and compliance.

  • Internet applications

    - This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet applications, including definitions about Software as a Service (SaaS) delivery models and words and phrases about web sites, e-commerce ...

Ask a Question About Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC)Powered by ITKnowledgeExchange.com

Get answers from your peers on your most technical challenges

Tech TalkComment

Share
Comments

    Results

    Contribute to the conversation

    All fields are required. Comments will appear at the bottom of the article.