Part of the Internet applications glossary:

Intel's Quick Web product has been discontinued. The Intel product was two words - Quick Web. There are a number of Internet and software companies with the name QuickWeb.

Quick Web was a product from Intel Corporation that was designed to speed up the delivery of Web pages to users. Quick Web was installed at several major Internet service providers ( ISP s). ISPs who installed Quick Web offered their users the option of subscribing to a faster delivery service for a somewhat larger fee. Quick Web offered to deliver pages faster in two ways:

  1. By compressing the graphic images it sent to the user. (The browser would not uncompress them; they would simply be somewhat lower quality images than you would get without Quick Web.)
  2. By caching the Web pages that users requested most frequently. Instead of a request going all the way to the Web site for a page, if the page has recently been requested through your ISP's server, it will find it and send it to you without your request having to travel all the way to the Web site and back. For example, many of Yahoo's most popular directory pages would probably be requested by many ISP users and would thus be available in the cache at the ISP. The ISP would periodically refresh the pages.

Intel believed that only users with large, high-resolution display monitors would notice the image quality difference. Users in Intel's field trials were apparently satisfied with the system. The Quick Web technology made the ISP server act like a proxy server , screening requests on behalf of the user and acting as a proxy or stand-in in forwarding (or not needing to forward) requests on to the Internet.

Users of Quick Web were able to turn the graphics compression on or off with a small window called a Speed Selector at the start of each browser session. (The window arrived from the server as a Java applet ; it did not have to be installed by the user.) Another applet called a Web-o-Meter popped up occasionally to tell how much performance was being increased.

An issue with Quick Web and page caching in general among sites that count page views for advertising purposes is how views from ISP caches can be counted. Intel said that Quick Web would keep track of page views at the ISP and publishers could be provided with these statistics. Intel said the product itself performed well but, because it wasn't selling well, it was being discontinued. More recently, a number of companies have emerged that provide content delivery services, including page caching, for high-traffic Web sites, and the number of Web users who are able to get Internet access at higher speeds has increased.

This was last updated in April 2005
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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