Definition

SRAM (static random access memory)

Part of the Computing fundamentals glossary:

Also see RAM types.

SRAM (static RAM) is random access memory (RAM) that retains data bits in its memory as long as power is being supplied. Unlike dynamic RAM (DRAM), which stores bits in cells consisting of a capacitor and a transistor, SRAM does not have to be periodically refreshed. Static RAM provides faster access to data and is more expensive than DRAM. SRAM is used for a computer's cache memory and as part of the random access memory digital-to-analog converter on a video card.

This was last updated in April 2005
Contributor(s): Evan Jennings
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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