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Squeak is an implementation of the Smalltalk programming environment that is designed to allow code to be run on any major operating system , including Windows 95/98/NT, Windows CE , and UNIX . Squeak includes a Smalltalk-80 compiler and a caching just-in-time compiler (JIT) compiler and a large class library. The environment supports real-time sound and music synthesis, Musical Instrument Digital Interface ( MIDI ) performance and scheduling, text-to-speech synthesis, 2- and 3-D graphics, and Web serving and interaction.

Squeak's easy-to-use graphical interface and its object-oriented approach make it an appealing development environment for educators. A pointer device such as a mouse is required as with all Smalltalk programming environments. The original mouse used with Smalltalk required three buttons each labeled yellow, red, and blue, which is still required today. If a three-button mouse is not available, it must be simulated using another method. For example, the Macintosh-based Squeak environment uses a single-button mouse so the functions are determined by context. This means that if the mouse is placed over a certain area of the screen or another key is pushed at the same time, a menu is activated.

The Squeak programming environment is not the same as the Squeak language developed by Rob Pike and Luca Cardelli in 1985.

This was last updated in September 2008

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