What is caddy? - Definition from WhatIs.com
Part of the Peripherals glossary:

A caddy is the plastic case that enclosed a CD-ROM disk in the period when players required them. Early CD-ROM disks were always enclosed in a caddy and the caddy was inserted in the player. More recent CD-ROM players, following the compact disc players, provide a tray on which you can directly lay the CD-ROM disk. A caddy is not to be confused with the so-called plastic "jewel case" that some CD-ROM disks come in. These are mainly provided for marketing and storage protection purposes.

This was last updated in April 2005
Contributor(s): Daniel David Sargent
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Related Terms


  • geo-fencing (geofencing)

    - Geo-fencing is a feature in a software program that uses the global positioning system (GPS) or radio frequency identification (RFID) to define geographical boundaries. A geofence is a virtual barr... (WhatIs.com)

  • Linear Tape-Open (LTO)

    - Linear Tape-Open (LTO) is a high-capacity tape storage technology that is open format, giving users access to compatible products from many suppliers. (SearchStorage.com)

  • logical unit number (LUN)

    - A logical unit number (LUN) identifies one or more physical or virtual storage devices to a SCSI initiator in a host server to enable data exchange. (SearchStorage.com)


  • Peripherals

    - Terms related to peripheral devices including definitions about keyboards or mice and words and phrases about printers, monitors, digital cameras and scanners.

  • Internet applications

    - This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet applications, including definitions about Software as a Service (SaaS) delivery models and words and phrases about web sites, e-commerce ...

Ask a Question. Find an Answer.Powered by ITKnowledgeExchange.com

Ask An IT Question

Get answers from your peers on your most technical challenges

Ask Question

Tech TalkComment



    Contribute to the conversation

    All fields are required. Comments will appear at the bottom of the article.