Part of the Internet technologies glossary:

In networks, a giant is a packet , frame , cell, or other transmission unit that is too large. Network protocols specify maximum and minimum sizes (and sometimes a single uniform size) for any transmission unit. For example, ATM packages all data into 53-byte cells. Any cell larger than that is discarded and recorded as a giant by network monitoring tools. The Remote Network Monitoring ( RMON ) standard information base for network adminstration calls them "oversize packets".

Also see runt .

This was last updated in October 2010
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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