What is gram (g or gm)? - Definition from WhatIs.com
Part of the IT standards and organizations glossary:

The gram (abbreviation, g or gm) is the cgs (centimeter/gram/second) unit of mass. A force of one dyne (1 dyn), applied to a mass of one gram (1 g), will cause that mass to accelerate at one centimeter per second squared (1 cm/s2).

Mass is often specified in larger or smaller units than the gram, by changing the power-of-10 prefix multiplier. A mass of one kilogram (1 kg) is 1000 g. A mass of one milligram (1 mg) is 0.001 g. A mass of one microgram (1 µg) is 10-6 g. A mass of one nanogram (1 ng) is 10-9 g. In the International System of Units (SI), the kilogram is the preferred unit of mass.

Also see kilogram, mass, small-unit metric system, and International System of Units (SI).

This was last updated in March 2011
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Related Terms

Definitions

  • farad (F)

    - The farad is the standard international unit of capacitance. Both the farad and Faraday's constant are symbolized by the capital letter F; however they are different. Faraday's constant is a measur... (WhatIs.com)

  • homologation

    - Homologation is the certification of a product to indicate that it meets regulatory standards. (SearchCIO.com)

  • XML (Extensible Markup Language)

    - Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a text-based format that allows for the structuring of electronic documents and is not limited to a set of labels. (SearchSOA.com)

Glossaries

  • IT standards and organizations

    - Terms related to information technology (IT) standards, including definitions about IT organizations and words and phrases about policies and compliance.

  • Internet applications

    - This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet applications, including definitions about Software as a Service (SaaS) delivery models and words and phrases about web sites, e-commerce ...

Ask a Question About gram (g or gm)Powered by ITKnowledgeExchange.com

Get answers from your peers on your most technical challenges

Tech TalkComment

Share
Comments

    Results

    Contribute to the conversation

    All fields are required. Comments will appear at the bottom of the article.