What is laserdisc? - Definition from WhatIs.com
Part of the Peripherals glossary:

Laserdisc is a technology and the physical medium used in storing and providing programmed access to a large database of text, pictures, and other objects, including motion video and full multimedia presentations.

The laserdisc itself is 12 inches in diameter and holds much more information than a CD-ROM disk can currently hold. Laserdiscs require relatively expensive players and are more expensive to distribute than CD-ROM disks. However, for school and corporate education purposes and any presentation requiring a great deal of motion video and the ability to create scripted or programmed access to selected portions of the laserdisc, the technology can be useful.

This was last updated in April 2005
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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