What is nanopaper? - Definition from WhatIs.com
Part of the Hardware glossary:

Nanopaper is a 3D rendering of thermally stable nanomaterial s made of long nanowire s created from titanium oxide using a hydrothermal heating process.

Nanopaper was created by chemists at the University of Arkansas. While nanopaper can withstand temperatures up to 700 degrees Celsius , it can also be folded by hand and cut with scissors. Potential uses include filtration of bacteria and pathogens, applications in protective clothing and flame-retardant fabrics, time-released drug capsules and even regeneration of tissue.

Nanopaper also has potential applications as a photocatalyst , as it can regenerate its chemical composition after exposure to UV light. As is the case with many forms of nanotechnology , real-world, commercial applications of nanopaper are still in development.

This was last updated in October 2006
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Related Terms


  • laser

    - A laser is a coherent and focused beam of photons; coherent, in this context, means that it is all one wavelength, unlike ordinary light which showers on us in many wavelengths. The acronym laser s... (WhatIs.com)

  • hardware virtualization

    - Hardware virtualization is the abstraction of computing resources from the software that uses those resources. Today, hardware virtualization is often called server virtualization or, simply, virtu... (SearchVMware.com)

  • robotics

    - Robotics is a branch of engineering that involves the conception, design, manufacture, and operation of robots. (WhatIs.com)


  • Hardware

    - Terms related to computer hardware, including definitions about cables, connectors and power supply units and words and phrases about computing peripheral devices including the keyboard, mouse, au...

  • Internet applications

    - This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet applications, including definitions about Software as a Service (SaaS) delivery models and words and phrases about web sites, e-commerce ...

Ask a Question About nanopaperPowered by ITKnowledgeExchange.com

Get answers from your peers on your most technical challenges

Tech TalkComment



    Contribute to the conversation

    All fields are required. Comments will appear at the bottom of the article.