What is raster image processor (RIP)? - Definition from WhatIs.com


raster image processor (RIP)

Part of the Multimedia and graphics glossary:

RIP is also an abbreviation for Routing Information Protocol .

A raster image processor (RIP) is a hardware or combination hardware/software product that converts images described in the form of vector graphics statements into raster graphics images or bitmap s. For example, laser printers use RIPs to convert images that arrive in vector form (for example, text in a specified font ) into rasterized and therefore printable form.

RIPs are also used to enlarge images for printing. They use special algorithm s (such as error diffusion and schochastic ) to provide large blow-ups without loss of clarity.

This was last updated in March 2011
Contributor(s): Dave Hatfield and Carl Wester
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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