What is spaghetti diagram? - Definition from WhatIs.com

Definition

spaghetti diagram

Part of the Software development glossary:

A spaghetti diagram (sometimes called a physical process flow or a point-to-point workflow diagram) is a line-based representation of the continuous flow of some entity, such as a person, a product or a piece of information, as it goes through some process. The name comes from the resemblance of the final product to a bowl of cooked spaghetti.

Spaghetti diagrams are often used in agile project management. Unlike spaghetti code, which is a derogatory term for unstructured language coding, the term spaghetti diagram carries no negative connotation. 

This was last updated in February 2013
Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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