Part of the Computing fundamentals glossary:

1) In information technology, support refers to functionality that is provided between or among products, programs, devices, modes, or accessories. For example, if you purchase a graphics program that allows for the inclusion of text inserts, audio, and full-motion video clips, you can create multimedia presentations. This program can be said to support text, audio, and full-motion video. Another example is a Web browser that can function with Java; the browser thus supports Java. Yet another example is a telephone line that can be used with a digital subscriber line (DSL) connection. This line can be said to support DSL. In general, if product X can be used with a program, device, mode, or accessory Y without the need for significant modification of either X or Y, then X supports Y. If product X cannot be used with a program, device, mode, or accessory Z without substantial modification of X or Z, then X does not support Z.

2) Support can also mean the personal assistance vendors provide to technicians and end users concerning hardware, operating systems, and programs. The term is frequently associated with the telephone help lines provided by most vendors. In this sense, the quality of support can be graded in degrees, ranging from atrocious to outstanding. The best customer or technical support consists of real-time conversations between end users and knowledgeable representatives for the vendor, and the availability of such representatives without long hold times. Such support is sometimes free, but often it is expensive, metered by the minute. In some cases, e-mail exchanges can suffice instead of telephone conversations, provided both the customer and the vendor representative know how to write what they mean in a clear, accurate, and concise manner.

This was last updated in September 2005
Contributor(s): Andy Peak
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Related Terms

Definitions

  • Easter Egg

    - An Easter Egg is an unexpected surprise -- an undocumented procedure or unauthorized feature that's playful in nature or gives credit to the software developer or chip designer. (WhatIs.com)

  • term boosting

    - Term boosting is the ability to assign higher importance to specific words in a search engine query. In Google, for example, advanced search options allow you to identify words that must be found i... (WhatIs.com)

  • greedy algorithm

    - A greedy algorithm is a mathematical process that looks for simple, easy-to-implement solutions to complex, multi-step problems by deciding which next step will provide the most obvious benefit. (WhatIs.com)

Glossaries

  • Computing fundamentals

    - Terms related to computer fundamentals, including computer hardware definitions and words and phrases about software, operating systems, peripherals and troubleshooting.

  • Internet applications

    - This WhatIs.com glossary contains terms related to Internet applications, including definitions about Software as a Service (SaaS) delivery models and words and phrases about web sites, e-commerce ...

Tech TalkComment

Share
Comments

    Results

    Contribute to the conversation

    All fields are required. Comments will appear at the bottom of the article.