Definition

wireless substitution

Part of the Wireless and mobile glossary:

Wireless substitution is the process of canceling landline phone service and relying solely upon mobile phone service. The trend toward wireless substitution is known as fixed-mobile substitution (FMS).

In 2012, a study from USTelecom reported that 39% of households within the United States were mobile-only. In addition to homes that had no landline at all, another 18% reported that although they had a landline they did not use it at all. 

A related trend, cord cutting, includes both wireless and VoIP substitution for landline service, as well as the cancellation of traditional television services, usually in favor of less expensive options. 

This was last updated in June 2013
Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

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