Browse Definitions :
Definition

3Vs (volume, variety and velocity)

Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore

3Vs (volume, variety and velocity) are three defining properties or dimensions of big data. Volume refers to the amount of data, variety refers to the number of types of data and velocity refers to the speed of data processing. According to the 3Vs model, the challenges of big data management result from the expansion of all three properties, rather than just the volume alone -- the sheer amount of data to be managed.

Gartner analyst Doug Laney introduced the 3Vs concept in a 2001 MetaGroup research publication, 3D data management: Controlling data volume, variety and velocity. More recently, additional Vs have been proposed for addition to the model, including variability -- the increase in the range of values typical of a large data set -- and value, which addresses the need for valuation of enterprise data.

The infographic below (reproduced with permission from Diya Soubra's post, The 3Vs that define Big Data, on Data Science Central) illustrates the increasing expansion of the 3Vs. 

 

This was last updated in February 2013

Continue Reading About 3Vs (volume, variety and velocity)

Join the conversation

4 comments

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

This is ridiculous. Coming up with abstract buzzwords to sell tools to distill garbage data into garbage results to CIOs reading about it in SkyMall.
Cancel
Great to see the industry finally adopting the "3Vs" of Big Data that Gartner first introduced over 12 years ago! Here's a link to the original piece I wrote on "The Three Dimensional Data Challenge" back in 2001 positing them: http://goo.gl/wH3qG. Interesting also to see others lop on additional "V"s that while interesting are decidedly no definitional characteristics of Big Data. --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney
Cancel
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
Cancel
I agree, as far as definitions go this is pretty useless. If one has never heard of the three V's before it is good to understand. What we really need is some kind of empirical definition that transcends time, sort of like Moore's Law. 

Here's my suggestion: "Data is Big Data when it is too big to work on any one commonly available computer, but rather requires a cluster of computers". "Commonly available" would then have to be defined somehow, for example "computers available in the majority of large and medium-sized businesses" so that mainframes would be eliminated.

The reason why a "cluster of computers" is important is because this requires a fundamental change in the underlying architecture of how mathematical functions are designed in order to perform acceptably when network communication is part of the system.

The amount of data that one computer can process has certainly changed over the years and will continue to do so. Therefore this kind of definition should be useful moving forward.
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • privacy compliance

    Privacy compliance is a company's accordance with established personal information protection guidelines, specifications or ...

  • data governance policy

    A data governance policy is a documented set of guidelines for ensuring that an organization's data and information assets are ...

SearchSecurity

SearchHealthIT

  • telemedicine (telehealth)

    Telemedicine is the remote delivery of healthcare services, such as health assessments or consultations, over the ...

  • Project Nightingale

    Project Nightingale is a controversial partnership between Google and Ascension, the second largest health system in the United ...

  • medical practice management (MPM) software

    Medical practice management (MPM) software is a collection of computerized services used by healthcare professionals and ...

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • disaster recovery (DR) test

    A disaster recovery test (DR test) is the examination of each step in a disaster recovery plan as outlined in an organization's ...

  • crisis management plan (CMP)

    A crisis management plan (CMP) is a document that outlines the processes an organization will use to respond to a critical ...

  • pandemic plan

    A pandemic plan is a documented strategy for business continuity in the event of a widespread outbreak of a dangerous infectious ...

SearchStorage

  • megabytes per second (MBps)

    Megabytes per second (MBps) is a unit of measurement for data transfer speed to and from a computer storage device.

  • zettabyte

    A zettabyte is a unit of measurement used by technology professionals and the general public to describe a computer or other ...

  • hybrid flash array

    A hybrid flash array is a solid-state storage system that contains a mix of flash memory drives and hard disk drives.

Close