Browse Definitions:
Definition

3Vs (volume, variety and velocity)

This definition is part of our Essential Guide: From data gathering to competitive strategy: The evolution of big data
Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore

3Vs (volume, variety and velocity) are three defining properties or dimensions of big data. Volume refers to the amount of data, variety refers to the number of types of data and velocity refers to the speed of data processing. According to the 3Vs model, the challenges of big data management result from the expansion of all three properties, rather than just the volume alone -- the sheer amount of data to be managed.

Gartner analyst Doug Laney introduced the 3Vs concept in a 2001 MetaGroup research publication, 3D data management: Controlling data volume, variety and velocity. More recently, additional Vs have been proposed for addition to the model, including variability -- the increase in the range of values typical of a large data set -- and value, which addresses the need for valuation of enterprise data.

The infographic below (reproduced with permission from Diya Soubra's post, The 3Vs that define Big Data, on Data Science Central) illustrates the increasing expansion of the 3Vs. 

The 3Vs of big data

 

This was last updated in February 2013 ???publishDate.suggestedBy???

Continue Reading About 3Vs (volume, variety and velocity)

Join the conversation

4 comments

Send me notifications when other members comment.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Please create a username to comment.

This is ridiculous. Coming up with abstract buzzwords to sell tools to distill garbage data into garbage results to CIOs reading about it in SkyMall.
Cancel
Great to see the industry finally adopting the "3Vs" of Big Data that Gartner first introduced over 12 years ago! Here's a link to the original piece I wrote on "The Three Dimensional Data Challenge" back in 2001 positing them: http://goo.gl/wH3qG. Interesting also to see others lop on additional "V"s that while interesting are decidedly no definitional characteristics of Big Data. --Doug Laney, VP Research, Gartner, @doug_laney
Cancel
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
Cancel
I agree, as far as definitions go this is pretty useless. If one has never heard of the three V's before it is good to understand. What we really need is some kind of empirical definition that transcends time, sort of like Moore's Law. 

Here's my suggestion: "Data is Big Data when it is too big to work on any one commonly available computer, but rather requires a cluster of computers". "Commonly available" would then have to be defined somehow, for example "computers available in the majority of large and medium-sized businesses" so that mainframes would be eliminated.

The reason why a "cluster of computers" is important is because this requires a fundamental change in the underlying architecture of how mathematical functions are designed in order to perform acceptably when network communication is part of the system.

The amount of data that one computer can process has certainly changed over the years and will continue to do so. Therefore this kind of definition should be useful moving forward.
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • risk map (risk heat map)

    A risk map, also known as a risk heat map, is a data visualization tool for communicating specific risks an organization faces. A...

  • internal audit (IA)

    An internal audit (IA) is an organizational initiative to monitor and analyze its own business operations in order to determine ...

  • pure risk (absolute risk)

    Pure risk, also called absolute risk, is a category of threat that is beyond human control and has only one possible outcome if ...

SearchCloudProvider

  • cloud ecosystem

    A cloud ecosystem is a complex system of interdependent components that all work together to enable cloud services.

  • cloud services

    Cloud services is an umbrella term that may refer to a variety of resources provided over the internet, or to professional ...

  • uncloud (de-cloud)

    The term uncloud describes the action or process of removing applications and data from a cloud computing platform.

SearchSecurity

  • cyberextortion

    Cyberextortion is a crime involving an attack or threat of an attack coupled with a demand for money or some other response in ...

  • Cybercrime

    Cybercrime is any criminal activity that involves a computer, networked device or a network.

  • National Security Agency (NSA)

    The National Security Agency is the official U.S. cryptologic organization of the United States Intelligence Community under the ...

SearchHealthIT

  • Practice Fusion

    Practice Fusion Inc. is a San Francisco-based company that developed a free electronic health record (EHR) system available to ...

  • RHIA (Registered Health Information Administrator)

    An RHIA, or registered health information administrator, is a certified professional who oversees the creation and use of patient...

  • 21st Century Cures Act

    The 21st Century Cures Act is a wide-ranging healthcare bill that funds medical research and development, medical device ...

SearchDisasterRecovery

SearchStorage

  • Random Access Memory (RAM)

    Random Access Memory (RAM) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • floating gate transistor (FGT)

    A floating gate transistor (FGT) is a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology capable of holding an electrical ...

  • bad block

    A bad block is an area of storage media that is no longer reliable for storing and retrieving data because it has been physically...

SearchSolidStateStorage

  • hybrid hard disk drive (HDD)

    A hybrid hard disk drive is an electromechanical spinning hard disk that contains some amount of NAND Flash memory.

Close