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802.11ad

Contributor(s): Stan Gibilisco

802.11ad, also called WiGig 1.0, is a proposed specification in the 802.11 family applicable to WLANs (wireless local area networks). 802.11ad represents an extension or update of the current 802.11a standard.

Networks using 802.11ad will operate in the 60-GHz (gigahertz) band using OFDM (orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing). The enhancements supported by 802.11ad will facilitate simultaneous streaming of HD (high definition) video to multiple clients in large office environments, as well as faster wireless synchronization and backup of large files.

New features that will exist in 802.11ad, over and above those proposed for 802.11ac (another enhancement to 802.11a), include:

  • Native 802.11a/b/g/n/ac support.
  • Seamless switching between 2.4-, 5-, and 60-GHz bands.
  • Channel width up to 2160 MHz (megahertz).
  • Throughput of up to 7 Gbps (gigabits per second).
  • Built-in support for wired connections.
  • Working range of 10 meters or more.
  • Improved functionality for mobile devices.
  • Advanced security features.
  • Support for power management.

For information about other specifications in the 802 family, see the IEEE 802 Wireless Standards Fast Reference.

This was last updated in August 2012

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802.11ad - how can I be certain this type of router will work in my home?
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This standard is backwards compatible by way of design "Native 802.11a/b/g/n/ac support". Basically 802.11a has been secured and enhanced now it's awesome. My thoughts as for now this will be the new standard until the need to add higher frequencies in the Ghz range for more channels with more band of frequencies.
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