Browse Definitions :
Definition

96-minute rule

The 96-minute rule is a productivity guideline recommending that knowledge workers set aside that period of time each day to address their most crucial tasks. 

Essentially, the 96-minute rule says that people should dedicate themselves to their most important work for 96 minutes, avoiding multitasking and protecting themselves from interruptions and distractions such as phone calls, email and instant messaging, web browsing and social media. The first 96 minutes of the work day are generally considered the most effective, although that may vary from one individual to another. 

The rule is derived from the Pareto principle. According to the Pareto principle, 80% of outcomes are determined by 20% of the inputs. In this case, for example, 80% of a worker's output is accomplished in 20% of that worker's time. Randy Mayeux, a corporate trainer, devised the rule by calculating 20% of an eight-hour work day. The 96-minute rule is fairly congruent with management expert Peter Drucker’s claim that 90 minutes is the smallest effective time period required for meaningful knowledge work.

The effects of distraction on productivity have been demonstrated in a number of research studies. A study by Basex, a research firm based in New York, found that workers were distracted or interrupted, on average, every 11 minutes and that it took them an average of 25 minutes to return to their original tasks. 

 

 

This was last updated in August 2013

Continue Reading About 96-minute rule

SearchCompliance

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity

  • unified threat management (UTM)

    Unified threat management (UTM) describes an information security (infosec) system that provides a single point of protection ...

  • physical security

    Physical security is the protection of personnel, hardware, software, networks and data from physical actions and events that ...

  • attack vector

    An attack vector is a path or means by which an attacker or hacker can gain access to a computer or network server in order to ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close