Browse Definitions :
Definition

ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009)

What is ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009)?

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) is an economic stimulus bill created to help the United States economy recover from an economic downturn that began in late 2007. Congress enacted ARRA February 17, 2009.

ARRA allocates $787 billion to fund tax cuts and supplements to social welfare programs as well as increased spending for education, health care , infrastructure and the energy sector.

According to ARRA's statement of purpose, it was developed to:

  • To preserve and create jobs and promote economic recovery.
  • To assist those most impacted by the recession.
  • To provide investments needed to increase economic efficiency by spurring technological advances in science and health.
  • To invest in transportation, environmental protection, and other infrastructure that will provide long-term economic benefits.
  • To stabilize State and local government budgets, in order to minimize and avoid reductions in essential services and counterproductive state and local tax increases.

See also: HITECH Act, Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP)

Learn More About IT:
> Wikipedia covers the history and content of ARRA in greater detail.
> Recovery.gov is the official website dedicated to information about ARRA programs, spending and progress.
> The full text of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) is available online.

This was last updated in March 2010

Join the conversation

5 comments

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

I would like to know what the ARRA is & what they do please email me back
Cancel
hi
Cancel
seb
Cancel
hey thats me
Cancel
sebsed
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

File Extensions and File Formats

Powered by:

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • brute force attack

    Brute force (also known as brute force cracking) is a trial and error method used by application programs to decode encrypted ...

  • spyware

    Spyware is software that is installed on a computing device without the user's knowledge. Spyware can be difficult to detect; ...

  • ATM black box attack

    An ATM black box attack, also referred to as jackpotting, is a type of banking-system crime in which the perpetrators bore holes ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR)

    Business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) are closely related practices that describe an organization's preparation for ...

  • warm site

    A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes...

  • disaster recovery (DR) test

    A disaster recovery test (DR test) is the examination of each step in a disaster recovery plan as outlined in an organization's ...

SearchStorage

  • enterprise storage

    Enterprise storage is a centralized repository for business information that provides common data management, protection and data...

  • disk array

    A disk array, also called a storage array, is a data storage system used for block-based storage, file-based storage or object ...

  • optical storage

    Optical storage is any storage type in which data is written and read with a laser. Typically, data is written to optical media, ...

Close