Browse Definitions :
Definition

Alphabet, Inc.

Contributor(s): Ivy Wigmore

Alphabet, Inc. is a conglomerate founded by Google to serve as its holding company; Google is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Alphabet.

Google maintains control of search, You Tube, the Android operating system and apps, while other offshoots of the former company including Calico, Google Ventures, Google Capital, Google X, and Nest Labs are, like Google, Alphabet subsidiaries, each of which has its own CEO.

Alphabet was founded October 2, 2015 by Google co-founders Sergey Brin, who will serve as president of the new company, and Larry Page, who will serve as CEO. Google's former Product Chief, Sundar Pichai, is now CEO of the subsidiary. Google shares were transferred to Alphabet stock on a share-for-share basis. The new company trades under Google's former ticker symbols, GOOG and GOOGL.

According to Larry Page's announcement, they chose the company's name because the alphabet is "a collection of letters that represent language, one of humanity's one of humanity’s most important innovations, and is the core of how we index with Google search." Page also said they liked the fact that the name breaks down into Alpha-bet. In a financial context, Alpha means investment return above benchmark.

Matt Schaefer explains Google's reorganization into Alphabet:

Fun fact: The company's announcement release about Alphabet included an Easter Egg. To see it, click the period after "drone delivery effort."

This was last updated in October 2015

Continue Reading About Alphabet, Inc.

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

Dateiendungen und Dateiformate

Gesponsert von:

SearchCompliance

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

  • Whistleblower Protection Act

    The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 is a law that protects federal government employees in the United States from ...

SearchSecurity

  • reverse brute-force attack

    A reverse brute-force attack is a type of brute-force attack in which an attacker uses a common password against multiple ...

  • orphan account

    An orphan account, also referred to as an orphaned account, is a user account that can provide access to corporate systems, ...

  • voice squatting (skill squatting)

    Voice squatting is an attack vector for voice user interfaces (VUIs) that exploits homonyms (words that sound the same but are ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • business continuity policy

    Business continuity policy is the set of standards and guidelines an organization enforces to ensure resilience and proper risk ...

  • business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR)

    Business continuity and disaster recovery (BCDR) are closely related practices that describe an organization's preparation for ...

  • warm site

    A warm site is a type of facility an organization uses to recover its technology infrastructure when its primary data center goes...

SearchStorage

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • primary storage (main storage)

    Primary storage is the collective methods and technologies used to capture and retain digital information that is in active use ...

  • cache memory

    Cache memory, also called CPU memory, is high-speed static random access memory (SRAM) that a computer microprocessor can access ...

Close