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BOOT (build, own, operate and transfer)

What is BOOT (build, own, operate, transfer)?

BOOT (build, own, operate, transfer) is a public-private partnership (PPP) project model in which a private organization conducts a large development project under contract to a public-sector partner, such as a government agency. A BOOT project is often seen as a way to develop a large public infrastructure project with private funding.

Here's how the BOOT model works: The public-sector partner contracts with a private developer - typically a large corporation or consortium of businesses with specific expertise - to design and implement a large project. The public-sector partner may provide limited funding or some other benefit (such as tax exempt status) but the private-sector partner assumes the risks associated with planning, constructing, operating and maintaining the project for a specified time period. During that time, the developer charges customers who use the infrastructure that's been built to realize a profit. At the end of the specified period, the private-sector partner transfers ownership to the funding organization, either freely or for an amount stipulated in the original contract. Such contracts are typically long-term and may extend to 40 or more years.

BOOT is sometimes known as BOT (build, own, transfer). Variations on the BOOT model include BOO (build, own, operate), BLT (build, lease, transfer) and BLOT (build, lease, operate, transfer).

This was last updated in December 2009

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