Browse Definitions :
Definition

Basel II

Basel II is an international business standard that requires financial institutions to maintain enough cash reserves to cover risks incurred by operations. The Basel accords are a series of recommendations on banking laws and regulations issued by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BSBS). The name for the accords is derived from Basel, Switzerland, where the committee that maintains the accords meets.

Basel II improved on Basel I, first enacted in the 1980s, by offering more complex models for calculating regulatory capital. Essentially, the accord mandates that banks holding riskier assets should be required to have more capital on hand than those maintaining safer portfolios. Basel II also requires companies to publish both the details of risky investments and risk management practices. The full title of the accord is Basel II: The International Convergence of Capital Measurement and Capital Standards - A Revised Framework.

The three essential requirements of Basel II are:

  1. Mandating that capital allocations by institutional managers are more risk sensitive.
  2. Separating credit risks from operational risks and quantifying both.
  3. Reducing the scope or possibility of regulatory arbitrage by attempting to align the real or economic risk precisely with regulatory assessment.

Basel II has resulted in the evolution of a number of strategies to allow banks to make risky investments, such as the subprime mortgage market. Higher risks assets are moved to unregulated parts of holding companies. Alternatively, the risk can be transferred directly to investors by securitization, the process of taking a non-liquid asset or groups of assets and transforming them into a security that can be traded on open markets.

This was last updated in January 2008

Continue Reading About Basel II

SearchCompliance

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

  • risk assessment

    Risk assessment is the identification of hazards that could negatively impact an organization's ability to conduct business.

SearchSecurity

  • honeypot (computing)

    A honeypot is a network-attached system set up as a decoy to lure cyber attackers and detect, deflect and study hacking attempts ...

  • spam trap

    A spam trap is an email address that is used to identify and monitor spam email.

  • cracker

    A cracker is someone who breaks into someone else's computer system, often on a network; bypasses passwords or licenses in ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

  • erasure coding

    Erasure coding (EC) is a method of data protection in which data is broken into fragments, expanded and encoded with redundant ...

Close