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Bluetooth 2.0+EDR

Definition - What is Bluetooth 2.0+EDR

Bluetooth 2.0+EDR and Bluetooth 2.1+EDR are specifications for short-range wireless data exchange. Both Version 2.0 and 2.1 support EDR (Enhanced Data Rate), a faster PSK modulation scheme capable of transmitting data 2 or 3 times faster than previous versions of Bluetooth. 

Version 2.1+EDR is built to be more secure and make man-in-the-middle (eavesdropping) attacks more difficult. Connecting, which is called "pairing" is easier than in previous versions. In version 2, a Bluetooth device will make a connection automatically and all the end user has to do is confirm the connection.  Version 2 also allows multiple Bluetooth connections at the same time. 

A feature called Sniff Subrating extends battery life by reducing the active duty cycle of Bluetooth devices like keyboards and mice to improve battery life. Bluetooth hosts can specify maximum transmit and receive latencies so that low-power devices can know how often they must exit and re-enter "sniff mode." This can result in up to five times the battery life experienced by older low-power Bluetooth devices.

Specifications Bluetooth 1.0 Bluetooth 1.2 Bluetooth 2.0+EDR
(enhanced data rate)
Bluetooth 2.1+EDR
(enhanced data rate)
Bluetooth 3.0 HS
(high speed)
Transmission rate 721 kbit/s 721 kbit/s 2.1 Mbits/s 3 Mbits/s 24 Mbit/s
Adopted 2002 2005 2004 2007 2009
Backward compatible yes yes yes yes
Simple Secure Pairing yes yes yes yes
Near Field Communication yes yes
Sniff Subrating yes yes
802.11 Protocol Adaptation Layer (PAL) yes
Standard PAN range     10 meters (33 feet) 10 meters (33 feet) 10 meters (33 feet)

You can find the complete Bluetooth specifications listed here.

Learn more:

Bluetooth 2.0+EDR is a common specification for laptop computers

This was last updated in March 2010
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