Browse Definitions :
Definition

CMOS sensor

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

A CMOS sensor is an electronic chip that converts photons to electrons for digital processing.

CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) sensors are used to create images in digital cameras, digital video cameras and digital CCTV cameras. CMOS can also be found in astronomical telescopes, scanners and barcode readers. The optical technology is used in machine vision for robots, in optical character recognition (OCR), in the processing of satellite photographs and in the enhancement of radar images, especially for meteorology.

Like other semiconductor technologies, CMOS chips are produced by photolithography. The chips feature an array of minute light-capturing cells that pick up the photons at their various wavelengths as focused by a lens, translating them into electrons, much like a tiny solar cell. The CMOS cells are surrounded by transistors, which amplify the charge of the electrons gathered by the cells, sending them across the chip by tiny wires in the chip’s circuitry. A digital-to-analog converter at one corner of the device reads the electrons and translates the differing charges of individual cells into pixels of various colors. 

CMOS’ low manufacturing cost makes it possible to create low-cost consumer devices. Advances in CMOS technology have made it possible for them to approach their competitor in high-end digital cameras, charge-coupled devices (CCD). In contrast to CMOS, CCD cells are not surrounded by transistors and must actively use power to gather light. This makes them less power-efficient but also enables the benefits of a lower-noise image and greater light sensitivity.

This was last updated in February 2018

Continue Reading About CMOS sensor

Join the conversation

1 comment

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

How much do you know about the science behind digital imaging technologies?
Cancel

-ADS BY GOOGLE

Extensions de fichiers et formats de fichiers

Motorisé par:

SearchCompliance

  • California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

    The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is legislation in the state of California that supports an individual's right to ...

  • compliance audit

    A compliance audit is a comprehensive review of an organization's adherence to regulatory guidelines.

  • regulatory compliance

    Regulatory compliance is an organization's adherence to laws, regulations, guidelines and specifications relevant to its business...

SearchSecurity

  • BlueKeep (CVE-2019-0708)

    BlueKeep (CVE-2019-0708) is a vulnerability in the Remote Desktop (RDP) protocol that affects Windows 7, Windows XP, Server 2003 ...

  • endpoint detection and response (EDR)

    Endpoint detection and response (EDR) is a category of tools and technology used for protecting computer hardware devices–called ...

  • ransomware

    Ransomware is a subset of malware in which the data on a victim's computer is locked, typically by encryption, and payment is ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • disaster recovery team

    A disaster recovery team is a group of individuals focused on planning, implementing, maintaining, auditing and testing an ...

  • cloud insurance

    Cloud insurance is any type of financial or data protection obtained by a cloud service provider. 

  • business continuity software

    Business continuity software is an application or suite designed to make business continuity planning/business continuity ...

SearchStorage

  • blockchain storage

    Blockchain storage is a way of saving data in a decentralized network which utilizes the unused hard disk space of users across ...

  • disk mirroring (RAID 1)

    RAID 1 is one of the most common RAID levels and the most reliable. Data is written to two places simultaneously, so if one disk ...

  • RAID controller

    A RAID controller is a hardware device or software program used to manage hard disk drives (HDDs) or solid-state drives (SSDs) in...

Close