Browse Definitions :
Definition

Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP)

Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is a protocol that specifies how low-power compute-constrained devices can operate in the internet of things (IoT). Designed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (ITEF), CoAP is specified in IETF RFC 7252.

CoAP is designed to enable simple, constrained devices to join the IoT even through constrained networks with low bandwidth and low availability. The protocol is generally used for machine-to-machine (M2M) communication.

CoAP functions as a sort of HTTP for constrained devices, enabling such component level equipment as sensors or actuators to communicate on the IoT, being controlled and passing along their data as part of a system. The protocol is designed for reliability in low bandwidth and high congestion through its low power draw and low network overhead. According to Jullian Vermillard, Sierra Wireless principle engineer of software, in a network with limited connectivity or a lot of congestion CoAP can continue to work where TCP-based protocols such as MQTT fail to complete a handshake.

The efficient and conservative traits of CoAP can enable devices operating in poor signal quality to send their data reliably or enable a satellite in orbit maintain to its distant communication successfully. Despite CoAp’s ability to run on small devices, it supports networks with billions of nodes. For security, the DTLS parameters chosen for default are an equivalent to 3072 bit RSA keys.

This was last updated in January 2018

Continue Reading About Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP)

SearchCompliance

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity

  • information security (infosec)

    Information security, often shortened to infosec, is the practice, policies and principles to protect data and other kinds of ...

  • denial-of-service attack

    A denial-of-service (DoS) attack is a security event that occurs when an attacker makes it impossible for legitimate users to ...

  • user authentication

    User authentication verifies the identity of a user attempting to gain access to a network or computing resource by authorizing a...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close