Browse Definitions :
Definition

DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model)

Contributor(s): Kim Cleary

DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model) is a set of Microsoft concepts and program interfaces in which client program object s can request services from server program objects on other computers in a network. DCOM is based on the Component Object Model (COM), which provides a set of interfaces allowing clients and servers to communicate within the same computer (that is running Windows 95 or a later version).

For example, you can create a page for a Web site that contains a script or program that can be processed (before being sent to a requesting user) not on the Web site server but on another, more specialized server in the network. Using DCOM interfaces, the Web server site program (now acting as a client object ) can forward a Remote Procedure Call ( RPC ) to the specialized server object, which provides the necessary processing and returns the result to the Web server site. It passes the result on to the Web page viewer.

DCOM can also work on a network within an enterprise or on other networks besides the public Internet. It uses TCP/IP and Hypertext Transfer Protocol . DCOM comes as part of the Windows operating systems. DCOM is or soon will be available on all major UNIX platforms and on IBM's large server products. DCOM replaces OLE Remote Automation.

DCOM is generally equivalent to the Common Object Request Broker Architecture ( CORBA ) in terms of providing a set of distributed services. DCOM is Microsoft's approach to a network-wide environment for program and data objects. CORBA is sponsored by the rest of the information technology industry under the auspices of the Object Management Group ( OMG ).

This was last updated in March 2011

Continue Reading About DCOM (Distributed Component Object Model)

SearchCompliance

SearchSecurity

  • cyber attack

    A cyber attack is any attempt to gain unauthorized access to a computer, computing system or computer network with the intent to ...

  • backdoor (computing)

    A backdoor is a means to access a computer system or encrypted data that bypasses the system's customary security mechanisms.

  • post-quantum cryptography

    Post-quantum cryptography, also called quantum encryption, is the development of cryptographic systems for classical computers ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud SLA (cloud service-level agreement)

    A cloud SLA (cloud service-level agreement) is an agreement between a cloud service provider and a customer that ensures a ...

  • NOR flash memory

    NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

Close