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EMMA (Enabling Mobile Machine Automation)

EMMA (Enabling Mobile Machine Automation) is the autonomy-enabling operating system behind Brain Corp’s autonomy as a service offering for existing floor-cleaning and polishing machines.

EMMA enables many manually-operated and powered cleaning machines to operate autonomously with artificial intelligence (AI). Enabling existing machines means that companies can save costs using existing equipment as well as use products they already know to perform to the best results.

The cost of janitorial work is estimated to be 80 percent labor. In the future, labor costs for janitorial work are estimated to increase up to 300 percent. As with many labor jobs, automation can reduce costs and time related to human workers.

Automation of existing machines is enabled by installing a Brain Module in the customer’s floor care machines. Autonomous operation is further enhanced by the Robotic Operation Center (ROC) that provides real time fleet monitoring and remote supervision. ROC also alerts maintenance staff when repairs are needed, reducing downtime.

Along with the Brain module, EMMA makes it possible for equipment to navigate indoors, a difficult task. EMMA learns the environment planning future runs more efficiently. EMMA also avoids changes in obstacles and unexpected human interference with routes.

See also: robot economy

This was last updated in January 2018

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