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EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool)

EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) is a ranking system that helps purchasers in the public and private sectors evaluate, compare and select desktop computers, notebooks and monitors based on their environmental attributes. EPEAT evaluates products according to 51 specific criteria into three tiers of environmental performance – Bronze, Silver and Gold.

EPEAT is managed and operated by staff contracted from the Green Electronics Council. The tool was originally developed between August 2002 and May 2006 under a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA ).

This was last updated in March 2011
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