Browse Definitions :
Definition

EU Data Protection Directive (Directive 95/46/EC)

EU Data Protection Directive (also known as Directive 95/46/EC) is a regulation adopted by the European Union to protect the privacy and protection of all personal data collected for or about citizens of the EU, especially as it relates to processing, using or exchanging such data.

The EU Data Protection Directive is based on recommendations first proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's (OECD). These recommendations are founded on seven principles:

  • Subjects whose data is being collected should be given notice of such collection.
  • Subjects whose personal data is being collected should be informed as to the party or parties collecting such data.
  • Once collected, personal data should be kept safe and secure from potential abuse, theft, or loss.
  • Personal data should not be disclosed or shared with third parties without consent from its subject(s).
  • Subjects should granted access to their personal data and allowed to correct any inaccuracies.
  • Data collected should be used only for stated purpose(s) and for no other purposes.
  • Subjects should be able to hold personal data collectors accountable for adhering to all seven of these principles.

The Data Protection Directive is superseded by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which was adopted by the European Parliament and European Council in April 2016 and will become enforceable in May 2018. The new regulation expands upon previous requirements for collecting, storing and sharing personal data and requires the subject's consent to be given explicitly and not checked off by default. 

This was last updated in January 2008

Continue Reading About EU Data Protection Directive (Directive 95/46/EC)

Join the conversation

2 comments

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

Why did the EU take so long to update data protection laws when the world has changed so much?
Cancel
European laws have no bearing on US law. This is being promoted by security companies to generate revenue for new services and products. The only companies that can be penalized for failure to comply are companies with a global footprint in Europe or companies that exist in Europe.
Cancel

SearchCompliance

  • risk assessment

    Risk assessment is the identification of hazards that could negatively impact an organization's ability to conduct business.

  • PCI DSS (Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard)

    The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a widely accepted set of policies and procedures intended to ...

  • risk management

    Risk management is the process of identifying, assessing and controlling threats to an organization's capital and earnings.

SearchSecurity

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

  • cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR)

    Cloud disaster recovery (cloud DR) is a combination of strategies and services intended to back up data, applications and other ...

SearchStorage

  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • business impact analysis (BIA)

    Business impact analysis (BIA) is a systematic process to determine and evaluate the potential effects of an interruption to ...

  • M.2 SSD

    An M.2 SSD is a solid-state drive that is used in internally mounted storage expansion cards of a small form factor.

Close