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Eiffel

Eiffel is an object-oriented programming language developed by Bertrand Meyer, owner of Interactive Software Engineering (ISE), and named after Gustave Eiffel, the engineer who designed the Eiffel Tower. ISE Eiffel encompasses the Eiffel language, a method, and a programming environment. The language itself includes analysis, design, and implementation tools and was designed to create reusable code and to be scalable . The idea is that reusable components make writing programs more efficient because they save programming time and increase reliability. Scalability enables initially small programs to be expanded later to meet new needs. Eiffel is available for use on all major platforms.

Eiffel was designed to be simple, easy to learn, and powerful. It has the ability to incorporate program elements written in other languages. Features of Eiffel include class es, multiple inheritance , polymorphism , and a disciplined exception mechanism. ISE claims that Eiffel enables the fast production of bug-free software that is easy to change and extend in response to user requests, and can be reused in many different applications.

This was last updated in September 2005

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