Browse Definitions :
Definition

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is a United States government agency with the purpose to coordinate aid and respond to disasters around the nation when local resources are insufficient. Commanding a budget of approximately $14 billion annually, the agency is headquartered in Washington D.C.

FEMA was created in 1978 as part of the Presidential Reorganization Plan No. 3, and implemented in 1979 under executive orders signed by President Jimmy Carter. One of the early projects of FEMA was to create a series of tunnels and bunkers for the protection of U.S. government officials. The agency was shown in action in responding to the dumping of toxic waste into the Love Canal in Niagara, New York in 1978 and the Three Mile Island nuclear incident in Pennsylvania in 1979.

The agency was made to coordinate response to crises that would otherwise overwhelm resources of local and state authorities. In order to get FEMA assistance, the governor of a state must declare a state of emergency and make formal contact to the president of FEMA. This declaration is necessary to receive aid, except in the case of states that contain property or assets of the federal government.

FEMA coordinates with other federal agencies, non-profit organizations and private sector companies when responding to disasters. When a disaster hits, FEMA collaborates and helps manage operations on the ground with agencies and organizations like the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Coast Guard, American Red Cross, Housing and Urban Development, Health and Human Services and Defense departments.

This was last updated in May 2018

Continue Reading About Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

SearchCompliance

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity

  • unified threat management (UTM)

    Unified threat management (UTM) describes an information security (infosec) system that provides a single point of protection ...

  • physical security

    Physical security is the protection of personnel, hardware, software, networks and data from physical actions and events that ...

  • attack vector

    An attack vector is a path or means by which an attacker or hacker can gain access to a computer or network server in order to ...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close