Browse Definitions :
Definition

Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM)

Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM), formerly called Google Cloud Messaging (GCM), is a free cloud service from Google that allows app developers to send notifications and messages to users across a variety of platforms, including Android, iOS and web applications. FCM is provided by Firebase, a company acquired by Google in 2014.

FCM allows software developers to send push notifications for their applications to end users through an application programming interface (API). Push notifications are popular on mobile devices because they conserve battery life, unlike pull notifications, which continually poll the developer’s server for new information and can drain a device’s battery life. With push notifications, the cloud service acts on behalf of the app and only connects to the mobile device when there are new notifications.

In order to send and receive messages using FCM, the two elements needed are a trusted environment or server to on which build, direct and send messages and an Android, iOS or Web client app to receive messages. With FCM, developers can send two types of messages to users: notifications messages and data messages. Notification messages are displayed on the user’s device by FCM on behalf of the application. Data messages are directly processed by the application, which is responsible for delivering the message to the user.

Using message targeting, FCM is able to deliver messages to applications in three ways: to single devices, to groups of devices, or to devices subscribed to topics. Developers have the option to create messages in the Notification composer, which can send targeted messages to specific segments of users. These messages are fully integrated with Firebase Analytics, which tracks user engagement and conversion.

This was last updated in September 2017

Continue Reading About Firebase Cloud Messaging (FCM)

SearchCompliance
  • ISO 31000 Risk Management

    The ISO 31000 Risk Management framework is an international standard that provides businesses with guidelines and principles for ...

  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

SearchSecurity
  • What is cyber hygiene and why is it important?

    Cyber hygiene, or cybersecurity hygiene, is a set of practices individuals and organizations perform regularly to maintain the ...

  • Pretty Good Privacy (PGP)

    Pretty Good Privacy or PGP was a popular program used to encrypt and decrypt email over the internet, as well as authenticate ...

  • email security

    Email security is the process of ensuring the availability, integrity and authenticity of email communications by protecting ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • information lifecycle management (ILM)

    Information lifecycle management (ILM) is a comprehensive approach to managing an organization's data and associated metadata, ...

  • WORM (write once, read many)

    In computer media, write once, read many, or WORM, is a data storage technology that allows data to be written to a storage ...

  • direct access

    In computer storage, direct access is the process of reading and writing data on a storage device by going directly to where the ...

Close