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GitLab

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

GitLab is an open source code repository and collaborative development platform.

GitLab offers a location for online code storage and collaborative development of massive software projects. The repository includes version control to enable hosting different development chains and versions, allowing users to inspect previous code and roll back to it in the event of unforeseen problems.

GitLab is a competitor to GitHub, the code repository that hosts Linus Torvalds’ Linux kernel development, among many other projects. As GitLab is developed on the same Git basis of version control, it functions very similarly.

Some of GitLab’s features include:

  • LDAP integration
  • Open source code library
  • Free hosting and services
  • Bug tracking mechanism
  • File editing in the web interface

GitLab supports both public and unlimited private development branches. In contrast, some competitors, such as GitHub, charge for private repositories, while others, such as Bitbucket, charge for additional users over the five allowed for free on a private repository.

Upon the confirmation of the purchase of GitHub by Microsoft on June 4, 2018, the GitLab saw a huge increase in users and the service crashed due to a mass migration of 250,000 GitHub users. The migration reaction was a result of the acquisition news itself as no changes had yet been made or even announced.

This was last updated in August 2018

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