Browse Definitions :
Definition

Google Now

Google Now is a Web-based service provided by Google that serves as a day planner. It works on tablet devices and smartphones that run Google's Android OS.

Google Now keeps track of a user's behavior as data is input to the device, and then later, at appropriate times, passively displays information that the user might find helpful in planning trips, keeping appointments, and conducting daily activities. The displays, called "cards," can take many forms.

Some examples of what you can do:

  • Pull up a boarding pass at an airport to speed up the checkthrough process.
  • Get a summary of your exercise activity during the past month (miles walked, for example).
  • Get news updates at the local, regional, national, and world levels.
  • Check current traffic conditions to ensure that you leave for scheduled appointments early enough to arrive on time.
  • Access a summary of current weather conditions in your area, or at various points along a travel route.
  • Get up-to-the-minute information concerning your favorite sports teams.
  • Get navigation instructions to a hotel when you arrive in an unfamiliar town.
  • Set reminders for events that you purchased tickets for and might have forgotten about.
  • Check to see when online orders have shipped from retailers in distant locations.
  • Set reminders for friends' birthdays and other special occasions.
  • Get real-time information about stock prices for specific companies.
  • Get information about when the next bus or train will arrive.
  • Access Google Maps at any time, for any location or region of your choice.
  • Get information about restaurants, concerts, movies, or other events you might like.

Google Now keeps adding new cards, so the above list is by no means complete.

This was last updated in February 2013

Continue Reading About Google Now

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • DOS (disk operating system)

    A DOS, or disk operating system, is an operating system that runs from a disk drive. The term can also refer to a particular ...

  • private key

    A private key, also known as a secret key, is a variable in cryptography that is used with an algorithm to encrypt and decrypt ...

  • security token

    A security token is a physical or digital device that provides two-factor authentication for a user to prove their identity in a ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • What is RAID 6?

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive)

    A PCIe SSD (PCIe solid-state drive) is a high-speed expansion card that attaches a computer to its peripherals.

  • VRAM (video RAM)

    VRAM (video RAM) refers to any type of random access memory (RAM) specifically used to store image data for a computer display.

Close