Browse Definitions :
Definition

Greasemonkey

Greasemonkey is a browser extension that enables users to customize how Web sites display on their computers. Once Greasemonkey has been installed, user script s enable changes to the elements of Web pages. A user script may be either general or specific to a particular site. For example, a user script for Google called "Butler" makes it possible for users to remove advertisements and add links to Google search results.

Greasemonkey was created for the Firefox browser ; subsequently, versions have been developed for other browsers, including a version for Internet Explorer called GreasemonkIE. According to some analysts, the ability to alter online content may lead to the so-called hacked Web , a situation in which much of the Web is open to modification by users.

Greasemonkey and user scripts are relatively easy to install and therein lies a security issue. An unscrupulous programmer could insert malicious programming into a user script, and the average person would not be able to detect it by looking at the code. Malicious user scripts, like other malware , can harm a host computer or steal sensitive information, among other things. Aaron Boodman, the 26-year-old Seattle programmer who created Greasemonkey, suggests that user scripts should be approached with the same caution as other software, and that people should ensure that they come from a trusted source before installing them.

In the real world, "grease monkey" is a slang term for a mechanic.

This was last updated in March 2007

Continue Reading About Greasemonkey

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • threat modeling

    Threat modeling is a procedure for optimizing application, system or business process security by identifying objectives and ...

  • distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack

    A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack is one in which multiple compromised computer systems attack a target, such as a ...

  • social engineering

    Social engineering is an attack vector that relies heavily on human interaction and often involves manipulating people into ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

SearchStorage
  • bare-metal cloud

    Bare-metal cloud is a public cloud service that offers dedicated hardware resources without any installed operating systems or ...

  • race condition

    A race condition is an undesirable situation that occurs when a device or system attempts to perform two or more operations at ...

  • storage security

    Storage security is the group of parameters and settings that make storage resources available to authorized users and trusted ...

Close