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HP ePrint Platform

HP’s ePrint Platform is a printing method which utilizes the cloud to allow for on-the-go printing through E-mail.

While most printers require a connection to print, whether through wires or Wi-Fi, HP ePrint printers come with a custom e-mail address so that documents can be sent directly to the printer from any device that supports e-mail, such as a smartphone or iPad. This new method allows for across-the-world printing, enabling a businessman traveling in China to send documents to his office printer in New York, for instance. If you’d rather send a document now and have it printed later in the day, documents can be stored in the cloud and printed when desired.

In combination with its ePrint Platform, HP has developed several additions to make the printing experience easier.

• Connection to the Google cloud directly on the printer allows users to access Google Docs, Photos and Calendar without using a computer or web appliance.

• HP ePrintCenter acts as a hub for HP customers, letting them do things such as view the status of print jobs, check for device updates, and browse from new apps. Through ePrintCenter users can also set up a “Scheduled Delivery,” which lets users schedule certain documents, such as daily news stories, to be printed for a specific time or date range.

• HP apps pull material from websites, allowing users to select and print what they'd like directly from their printer. Mobile apps are also available which allow users to do things such as schedule a document to be printed at a FedEx or hotel for convenience while traveling.

HP announced that all new printers over the price of $99 will come equipped with the ePrint Platform.

Read More:

Find out more about the ePrint Platform on HP.com.

This was last updated in September 2010
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