Browse Definitions :
Definition

HTML 4.0

HTML 4.0 was the final version of the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) before the Extensible Markup Language (XHTML) and remains the set of markup on which most large Web sites today are based. Like all HTML levels, HTML 4.0 was the official "recommendation" of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the group that suggests industry standards for the Web.

Among new features introduced in HTML 4.0 were:

  • The cascading style sheet, the ability to control Web page content at multiple levels
  • The ability to create richer forms
  • Support for frames (which is already supported by the major browsers)
  • Enhancements for tables that make it possible to use captions to provide table content for Braille or speech users
  • The capability to manage pages so that they can be distributed in different languages

In practice, the two leading browsers, Netscape and Internet Explorer, support HTML 4.0 somewhat differently or offer non-standard approaches. These require Web developers that use more advanced features to create pages for each browser and send the appropriate pages to the user.

This was last updated in April 2005

Continue Reading About HTML 4.0

SearchCompliance
  • pure risk

    Pure risk refers to risks that are beyond human control and result in a loss or no loss with no possibility of financial gain.

  • risk reporting

    Risk reporting is a method of identifying risks tied to or potentially impacting an organization's business processes.

  • risk profile

    A risk profile is a quantitative analysis of the types of threats an organization, asset, project or individual faces.

SearchSecurity
  • script kiddie

    Script kiddie is a derogative term that computer hackers coined to refer to immature, but often just as dangerous, exploiters of ...

  • cipher

    In cryptography, a cipher is an algorithm for encrypting and decrypting data.

  • What is risk analysis?

    Risk analysis is the process of identifying and analyzing potential issues that could negatively impact key business initiatives ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • fault-tolerant

    Fault-tolerant technology is a capability of a computer system, electronic system or network to deliver uninterrupted service, ...

  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

SearchStorage
  • gigabyte (GB)

    A gigabyte (GB) -- pronounced with two hard Gs -- is a unit of data storage capacity that is roughly equivalent to 1 billion ...

  • MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory)

    MRAM (magnetoresistive random access memory) is a method of storing data bits using magnetic states instead of the electrical ...

  • storage volume

    A storage volume is an identifiable unit of data storage. It can be a removable hard disk, but it does not have to be a unit that...

Close