Browse Definitions :
Definition

Hall effect

The Hall effect is the movement of charge carriers through a conductor towards a magnetic attraction. The phenomenon is named for Edwin Hall, who discovered the effect in 1879.

The Hall effect causes a measurable voltage differential across the conductor such that one side is positively charged and the other negatively. The effect is manipulated and measured in the functioning of many electronic devices including joystick-like controls, compasses in smartphones, magnetometers, sensors and current-measuring devices. On a large scale, the effect is harnessed in Hall effect thrusters (HET) that launch some crafts into space. In the natural world, the Hall effect plays a role in gravitational collapses that result in the formation of protostars.

Electrons normally travel in a straight line. The Hall effect occurs with the production of a transverse force (Lorentz force) on the charge carriers moving through a conductor, such that they actively conduct a current in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. The magnet's north pole pulls the negative charge carriers (typically electrons) to the side of the conductor nearest the magnet. With all the flowing electrons of the carried current on one side of the conductor, that side is negatively charged and the other side is positively charged.

In a semiconductor, the effect is even greater as they have moving positive charge carriers, which are known as Halls. Halls are atoms that are positively charged, having lost one of their electrons. The positive charge carriers flow on the side of the semiconductor nearest the magnetic south pole, influencing the negative charge carriers on the side nearest the north pole. Both carriers are repelled by their opposing magnetic force.

This was last updated in March 2018

Continue Reading About Hall effect

SearchCompliance

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

  • risk assessment

    Risk assessment is the identification of hazards that could negatively impact an organization's ability to conduct business.

SearchSecurity

  • cyber espionage

    Cyber espionage, also called cyber spying, is a form of cyber attack that is carried out against a competitive company or ...

  • virus (computer virus)

    A computer virus is malicious code that replicates by copying itself to another program, computer boot sector or document and ...

  • spam trap

    A spam trap is an email address that is used to identify and monitor spam email.

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • dropout

    Dropout refers to data, or noise, that's intentionally dropped from a neural network to improve processing and time to results.

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

Close