Browse Definitions :
Definition

Hot Spot 2.0 (HS 2.0)

Hot Spot 2.0 (HS 2.0), also called Wi-Fi Certified Passpoint, is a new standard for public-access Wi-Fi that enables seamless roaming among WiFi networks and between WiFi and cellular networks. HS 2.0 was developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance and the Wireless Broadband Association to enable seamless hand-off of traffic  without requiring additional user sign-on and authentication.

A hot spot (or hotspot) is a wireless LAN (local area network) node that provides Internet connection and virtual private network (VPN) access from a given location for users of devices with wireless connectivity. Hot spots are common in hotels, airports, libraries, and coffee shops. Normally, a user must connect manually to a hotspot by checking the wireless connection options, selecting one, and entering authentication information, usually a simple password. The physical connectivity zone is determined by the range of the wireless router(s) owned by the establishment. In most cases the radius is about 100 to 200 meters.

The HS 2.0  specification is based on a set of protocols called 802.11u, which facilitates cellular-like roaming, increased bandwidth, and service on demand for wireless-equipped devices in general. When a subscriber's 802.11u-capable device is in range of at least one Wi-Fi network, the device automatically selects a network and connects to it. Network discovery, registration, provisioning, and access processes are automated, so that the user does not have to go through them manually in order to connect and stay connected.  

This was last updated in May 2013

Continue Reading About Hot Spot 2.0 (HS 2.0)

SearchCompliance

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

  • information governance

    Information governance is a holistic approach to managing corporate information by implementing processes, roles, controls and ...

  • enterprise document management (EDM)

    Enterprise document management (EDM) is a strategy for overseeing an organization's paper and electronic documents so they can be...

SearchSecurity

  • denial-of-service attack

    A denial-of-service (DoS) attack is a security event that occurs when an attacker makes it impossible for legitimate users to ...

  • information security (infosec)

    Information security, often shortened to infosec, is the practice, policies and principles to protect data and other kinds of ...

  • user authentication

    User authentication verifies the identity of a user attempting to gain access to a network or computing resource by authorizing a...

SearchHealthIT

SearchDisasterRecovery

  • risk mitigation

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • call tree

    A call tree is a layered hierarchical communication model that is used to notify specific individuals of an event and coordinate ...

  • Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS)

    Disaster recovery as a service (DRaaS) is the replication and hosting of physical or virtual servers by a third party to provide ...

SearchStorage

  • cloud storage

    Cloud storage is a service model in which data is transmitted and stored on remote storage systems, where it is maintained, ...

  • cloud testing

    Cloud testing is the process of using the cloud computing resources of a third-party service provider to test software ...

  • storage virtualization

    Storage virtualization is the pooling of physical storage from multiple storage devices into what appears to be a single storage ...

Close