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HyperTransport

Contributor(s): Chiou-Shann Fuh

HyperTransport is a high-speed, point-to-point, 32-bit technology for data transfer within the integrated circuits ( IC s) in computers and other devices. The technology allows data throughput in excess of 12.8 gigabytes per second (GB/sec). HyperTransport was developed by AMD in cooperation with several other companies, and is a trademark of the HyperTransport Consortium.

Computers using HyperTransport are characterized by low latency , compatibility with most operating system s, low pin count, scalability , and extensibility to advanced bus architectures. HyperTransport will work with a wide variety of input-output (I/O) devices, and a single channel can accommodate multiple devices.

HyperTransport is aimed at applications that require greater bandwidth than other current technologies allow. HyperTransport has obvious advantages in applications such as high-end animation programs, simulation programs, robot control, medical devices, and virtual reality . Some engineers envision the eventual use of this technology in general consumer appliances and electronic devices.

This was last updated in September 2005

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