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IBM i

IBM i is an operating system (OS) created to run on IBM’s Power Systems and Pure Systems for minicomputers and enterprise servers.

IBM i is a turnkey text-based OS that reduces the need for IT configuring and interventions. The object-based OS is the descendant of the OS/400 introduced in 1988 for AS/400.

The operating system is focused on mid-sized to enterprise businesses and is designed for ease of use, easy deployment and maintenance of reliable server operations. IBM i features a wizard interface for most administrative tasks, multiple disk redundancy, hot swapping of replacement disks, hardware failure detection and maintenance scheduling. System migration is achieved simply by restoring back-ups to new systems.

The IBM Power Systems can also run Advanced Interactive eXecutive (AIX) and Linux OSes. IBM Pure Systems can run Windows as well as any operating systems that Power Systems support. The latest release of IBM i was version 7.3 in April 2016. The OS continues to be updated with Technology Refreshes (TR), with TR4 being announced in February 2018.

This was last updated in September 2018

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