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IISP (Institute of Information Security Professionals)

The IISP (Institute of Information Security Professionals) is a London-based professional membership association who describes its purpose as: "to set the standard for professionalism in information security, and to speak with an independent and authoritative voice on the subject." The Institute provides networking opportunities for members and promotes education, awareness, and understanding of key principles, processes, and best practices involved in establishing, maintaining, and auditing information security.

In addition to corporate memberships, four levels of individual membership are available:

  • Affiliate: Open to anyone interested in the information security industry, especially those who do not yet meet certification or experience requirements necessary to qualify for Associate membership.
  • Associate: Open to those who have an information security qualification from some recognized university or from some international training organization including the CISSP (ISC-squared), CISM, CLAS, or ITPC. Acceptable qualifications also include professional involvement in building, maintaining, managing or operating information security infrastructures, or in teaching or training that conveys relevant skills and knowledge for two or more years. All such information must be documented on an application form provided following initial membership inquiries.
  • Full Membership: Open only to Associate members by invitation from the IISP. At present the IISP has concluded its pilot program for Full Membership, and is now inviting all associate members to become full members in chronological order of their joining the organization.
  • Fellow: A senior level of membership that has not yet been launched by the organization, but that is intended to recognize luminaries in the information security field.

This was last updated in January 2008

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