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K Desktop Environment (KDE)

K Desktop Environment (KDE) is an Open Source graphical desktop environment for UNIX workstations. Initially called the Kool Desktop Environment, KDE is an on going project with development taking place on the Internet and discussion sheld through the official KDE mailing list, numerous newsgroups, and Internet Relay Chat (IRC)channels. KDE has a complete graphical user interface (GUI) and includes a file manager, a window manager, a help system, a configuration system, tools and utilities, and several applications. The most popular suite of KDE applications is KOffice, which includes a word processor, a spreadsheet application, a presentation application, a vector drawing application, and image editing tools.  KOffice was released with KDE version 2.0 October 2000. On December 5, 2000, KDE2.0.1 was released.

Matthias Ettrich launched the KDE project in October 1996 with the goal of making the UNIX platform more attractive and easy to use for computer users who are familiar with a graphical interface instead of typed commands. Today, KDE is used with Linux, Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and LinuxPPC. Several hundred software programmers from all over the world contribute to the development of KDE.

This was last updated in August 2005

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