Browse Definitions :
Definition

Kano Model

The Kano Model is a product development theory which is centered on customer satisfaction. The model was developed by Professor Noriaki Kano in the 1980s.

The Kano Model and analysis tries to define what is required for a product to exist, compete or excel in the competitive marketplace by way of feature and corresponding consumer response. The model is effective in the prioritization of features.

Customer responses to features are broken down into one of five categories in the Kano Model. These categories, though they have been translated a number of ways, are: attractive, performance, must have, indifferent and undesirable.

Attractive features are ones that excite the customers and often are novel features.

Performance features either add to the desirability of the product based of effectiveness of the implementation.

Must have features are those standardized by their presence in the competition and, therefore, consumers demand them.

Indifferent features are present, but don’t affect the customer positively or negatively.

Undesirable features are those the customer finds to work poorly or can’t understand how to work correctly. Sometimes, too many features can push then into the undesirable category just by way of complexity.

The Kano Model assumes a downward migration of features from attractive to must have. This downward migration occurs because features once new and exciting become normalized and gradually become expected as a given. An example of the migration of feature from attractive to must have is in Wi-Fi connectivity. Once the domain of add-in cards, dongles and work and home networks, Wi-Fi is now expected not just in consumer electronics but in every commercial space for customers or it can have a negative impact on business.

This was last updated in October 2018

Continue Reading About Kano Model

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • identity provider

    An identity provider (IdP) is a system component that provides an end user or internet-connected device with a single set of ...

  • remote access

    Remote access is the ability for an authorized person to access a computer or network from a geographical distance through a ...

  • malware

    Malware, or malicious software, is any program or file that is intentionally harmful to a computer, network or server.

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • synchronous replication

    Synchronous replication is the process of copying data over a storage area network, local area network or wide area network so ...

  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

SearchStorage
  • cold storage

    Cold storage is a computer system or mode of operation designed for the retention of inactive data.

  • tiered storage

    Tiered storage is a method for assigning different categories of data to various types of storage media to reduce overall storage...

  • secondary storage

    Secondary storage is persistent storage for noncritical data that doesn't need to be accessed as frequently as data in primary ...

Close