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Mendix

Contributor(s): Matthew Haughn

Mendix is a low-code collaborative development platform for mobile and web-based applications.

The application development platform enables collaboration between business and IT users to foster innovation and speed development. Mendix supports mobile, tablet and desktop applications. The platform may be used to create new apps, such as those for IoT, or to update legacy applications.

Mendix claims to speed development of apps by up to 10x and with 70% less resources, as compared with traditional development. Part of this ease is created by a visual interface with drag-and-drop elements to enable functions. The simple representation and easy development foster continuous improvement while the end products support scaling. The low-code interface enables those unfamiliar with coding to help in the production of apps. At the same time, professional developers are supported and assisted through the abstraction of some of the repetitive and complicated underpinnings of apps and their connection to infrastructure.

Mendix supports continuous integration with DevOps. Model changes can be merged to version control repositories upon task completion. Change commitments trigger downloads of the latest app versions, which are then built from repository. The master branch is then validated before deployment.

The Mendix development platform is used by more than 3,400 organizations, and over 60,000 professionals use it to build apps. The platform offers an app gallery and solutions for insurance, financial services, education, logistics and manufacturing.

Mendix was founded in 2005 by Derek Roos and Derckjan Kruit. The company is headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts. The company’s purchase by Siemens AG for $730 million was announced in August 2018.

This was last updated in September 2018

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