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Microsoft Operations Framework (MOF)

What is Microsoft Operations Framework (MOF)?

Microsoft Operations Framework (MOF) is a series of 23 documents that guide IT professionals through the processes of creating, implementing and managing efficient and cost-effective services. 

MOF is an alternative framework to the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL). Like ITIL, MOF includes guidelines for the entire lifecycle of an IT service, from concept to retirement or replacement.

MOF encompasses three phases and a foundation layer of the IT service lifecycle:

  • The plan phase ensures alignment with business and IT objectives, policy compliance, financial management and reliability.
  • The deliver phase covers envisioning, planning, building, stabilizing and deploying the service.
  • The operate phase keeps operations, service monitoring and control service, customer service and problem management in line with service level agreement (SLA) goals.
  • The manage layer helps IT professionals manage governance, risk, and compliance (GRC); change and configuration; and team service.

MOF version 4.0 was released in April 2008. MOF 4.0 includes all MOF 3.0 processes and is aligned with ITIL version 3. Alignment with ITIL v3 allows IT managers to avoid retraining staff members on the essentials of MOS if they are familiar with ITIL.

Learn More About IT:
> More information about MOF and a download are available from the website.
> This tip from Stuart D. Galup explains 'How Microsoft Operations Framework 4.0 enhances IT service management.'

This was last updated in November 2008

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