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Qik

Qik is an online video streaming service that allows anyone with a strong wireless Internet connection and a video camera-equipped smartphone to broadcast live events. Bloggers, citizen journalists, students and new media professionals have all used Qik to essentially become independent television stations.

To broadcast using Qik, a user needs to download Qik's client software to a compatible handset with at least a 2G wireless connection. Nokia's N95 phone has proven popular with Qik users because of its superior optics. Qik launched a public beta in July 2008 that added many more Nokia models to the list, along with several Motorola and Samsung models. Jailbroken iPhones and some Windows Mobile smartphones work as well. Once the software has been installed, a user can immediately begin streaming live video. When the user has finished broadcasting, the session is archived as a recording on Qik.com and may be embedded elsewhere on the Internet. You must be a registered user to comment on videos or participate in live chatrooms.

Bloggers like Robert Scoble have used the service to capture "man on the street" interviews from many technology events and the annual Davos conference. Citizen journalists like Steve Garfield have used Qik to report election results, often scooping traditional  media. 

Learn more about IT:

You can find more information about Qik and download the client software at Qik.com.
 

This was last updated in August 2008

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