Browse Definitions :
Definition

Ruby on Rails (RoR or Rails)

Ruby on Rails, sometimes known as "RoR" or just "Rails," is an open source framework for Web development in Ruby, an object-oriented programming (OOP) language similar to Perl and Python.

The principle difference between Ruby on Rails and other frameworks for development lies in the speed and ease of use that developers working within the environment enjoy. Changes made to applications are immediately applied, avoiding the time consuming steps normally associated with the web development cycle. According to David Geary, a Java expert, the Ruby-based framework is five to 10 times faster than comparable Java-based frameworks. In a blog posting, Geary predicted that Rails would be widely adopted in the near future.

Rails is made up of several components, beyond Ruby itself, including:

  • Active record, an object-relational mapping layer
  • Action pack, a manager of controller and view functions
  • Action mailer, a handler of email
  • Action web services
  • Prototype, an implementer of drag and drop and Ajax functionality

Rails can run on most Web servers that support CGI. The framework also supports MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite, SQL Server, DB2 and Oracle. Rails is also an MVC (model, view, controller) framework where all layers are provided by Rails, as opposed to reliance on other, additional frameworks to achieve full MVC support. Invented by David Heinemeier Hanss, Ruby On Rails has been developed as an open-source project, with distributions available through rubyonrails.org.

This was last updated in April 2006

Continue Reading About Ruby on Rails (RoR or Rails)

SearchCompliance
  • OPSEC (operations security)

    OPSEC (operations security) is a security and risk management process and strategy that classifies information, then determines ...

  • smart contract

    A smart contract is a decentralized application that executes business logic in response to events.

  • compliance risk

    Compliance risk is an organization's potential exposure to legal penalties, financial forfeiture and material loss, resulting ...

SearchSecurity
  • cyberstalking

    Cyberstalking is a crime in which someone harasses or stalks a victim using electronic or digital means, such as social media, ...

  • What is cybersecurity?

    Cybersecurity is the protection of internet-connected systems such as hardware, software and data from cyberthreats.

  • private key

    A private key, also known as a secret key, is a variable in cryptography that is used with an algorithm to encrypt and decrypt ...

SearchHealthIT
SearchDisasterRecovery
  • What is risk mitigation?

    Risk mitigation is a strategy to prepare for and lessen the effects of threats faced by a business.

  • change control

    Change control is a systematic approach to managing all changes made to a product or system.

  • disaster recovery (DR)

    Disaster recovery (DR) is an organization's ability to respond to and recover from an event that affects business operations.

SearchStorage
  • RAM (Random Access Memory)

    RAM (Random Access Memory) is the hardware in a computing device where the operating system (OS), application programs and data ...

  • RAID 6

    RAID 6, also known as double-parity RAID, uses two parity stripes on each disk. It allows for two disk failures within the RAID ...

  • NOR flash memory

    NOR flash memory is one of two types of non-volatile storage technologies.

Close